200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

Resources

  • "BOYS and GIRLS! You can help your Uncle Sam Win the War."

    The poster encourages children to join the war effort by saving up to buy War Savings Stamps.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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  • Correspondence between Lida Jones and the Alabama Council of Defense.

    Lida Jones was the secretary of the Chilton County Council of Defense. The correspondence addresses peach seed and nuts collected in Chilton County, Alabama "for use in the manufacture of gas masks."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Audie Hill and Margaret Moffat in Red Cross uniforms standing outside the Red Cross headquarters in Montgomery, Alabama, during World War I.

    Margaret Moffat was the secretary of the Montgomery chapter of the American Red Cross.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • "Saving Daylight!"

    "Uncle Sam, Your Enemies Have Been Up and Are at Work on the Extra Hour of Daylight - When Will You Wake Up?" The poster shows Uncle Sam stretching in bed while allegorical German and Austrian figures work in Middle Europe.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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  • Letter from Dr. P. Colfax Rameau to Governor Charles Henderson.

    In the letter Rameau discusses his work to strengthen the African American war effort in his area: "I have been organizing local War Councils among the members of my race throughout the district for the conserving man-power in the mines for quite a while." He then offers his assistance in the proposed statewide "Negro War Council of Defense." Also included is a brief letter from Henderson to L.M. Hooper, chairman of the Alabama State Council of Defense, in which he encloses Rameau's correspondence.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • "CAN Vegetables Fruit AND the Kaiser too"

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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  • Letter from F.D. Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy in Washington, D.C., to Mrs. H.C. Semple, in Montgomery, Alabama.

    In the letter Roosevelt thanks Mrs. Semple for her "prompt and patriotic response to the NAVY's call for binoculars, telescopes, and spy-glasses." The Navy will attempt to return the items at the end of the war, "when it hoped that you will feel compensated for any evidence of wear, by the knowledge that you have supplied 'Eyes for the NAVY' during a very trying period."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Red Cross canteen service.

    "These women meet the trains and give cigarettes and candy to the boys, Mobile, Alabama."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Letter from Lucy Durr at Camp Sheridan to her son, Clifford.

    TRANSCRIPT INCLUDED. In the letter, Lucy discusses her work in the influenza ward at the Camp Sheridan hospital: "If this 'flu' keeps up much longer the casualty list over here will be longer than the one in France. You see I can't keep off the influenza. Seriously, if you get the least sick telegraph me. One trouble with the epidemic is the right care is not taken of the men in the beginning in most cases."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Restaurant closed as pro-German.

    Restaurant in Birmingham, Ala. Closed by the people on account of the pro-German attitude of the establishment. The photo shows a parade in the street. including a band and spectators, outside Thompson's restaurant. A sign in front of the restaurant reads, "THE KAISER'S Restaurant / SURE AND RAPID DISPOSAL." The front doors have been vandalized and there is a drawing of a German soldier on the window to the right of the doors.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • "Over There"

    Music and lyrics by George M. Cohan. Published by William Jerome Publishing Company, New York. The cover features William J. Reilly of the United States Navy. The song was incredibly popular during World War I.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Mary E. Goyette of Irvington, Alabama, holding a blue star service flag during World War I.

    During the war her son, Elmer Goyette, served as a private in the 152nd U.S. Infantry.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Excerpt from "Service of a Negro Hospital: The John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital, Tuskegee Institute."

    Author and hospital director John A. Kenney describes Tuskegee Institute's nursing program. The article also highlights nurses' work during the Spanish flu epidemic and includes the story of Bessie B. Hawes, class of 1918, who nursed a family near Talladega through the flu epidemic.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Excerpt from Twenty-Five Years in the Black Belt, the autobiography of William J. Edwards.

    Included here is chapter 20, "The Negro and the World War." The chapter begins by describing African American support for the war effort, but then turns to a discussion of democracy, equality, and civil rights: "Before the war, two expressions were commonly used by the white man and the Negro. The Negro's expression was this: -- 'I haven't any country,' and the white man's expression was: -- 'This is a white man's country.' Now both of these classes are saying, 'This is our country.'... we should win this war, because democracy was right and autocracy was wrong, and if we lose, and God forbid that we should, the fault will not be in democracy, but it will be due to the fact that we are not practicing what we preach." Edwards was a student of Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute in the late nineteenth century.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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  • Tacking up U.S. Food Administration posters at Mobile, Alabama.

    The woman in the photograph is putting the finishing touch on a sign adorning a buggy. The sign reads, "Will you help the Women of France? SAVE WHEAT." This woman traveled all over Mobile tacking up Food Administration posters.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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