200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

Resources

  • Enlisted soldier's uniform.

    Typical uniform and gear of a U.S. soldier in World War I. The doughboy typically wore the Model 1916 olive drab flannel shirt with reinforced elbows and wool trousers. His trench boots had hobnails attached to the bottom to give him further traction. The olive wool wrappings above the boot are called puttees. These were worn to protect the soldier’s legs, prevent mud from getting into the boot, and served as an additional layer for warmth during the winter months. Around the soldier’s neck is an aluminum identity disc. World War I marked the first war in which U.S. soldiers were required to wear identification tags. Information on the discs oftentimes included the soldier’s name, rank, military branch, and ID number.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • "In the Red Cross Hut at Issoudun."

    This drawing is from section 1, page 8 of the sketchbook of Penrose Vass Stout. It shows a soldier receiving refreshments from a Red Cross nurse. The caption reads, "Private Murry: 'Gee! Its nice to come in here an get nice things to eat. A guy's mighty apter furget de little delicacies of home setch as napkins and toothpicks." The sketchbook contains approximately fifty military-themed sketches, including portraits of 27th Aero Squadron members; detailed drawings of Nieuport planes; and realistic descriptions of camp life and training exercises.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Letter from Penrose Vass Stout, en route to Europe, to his family.

    TRANSCRIPT INCLUDED. During World War I Stout was a pilot, eventually serving as a lieutenant in the 27th Aero Squadron, First Pursuit Group. In this letter he describes his four-day journey to Europe aboard a troop transport ship, including the on-ship blackouts. Names of places and the ship have been censored.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Pages from the scrapbook created by Ida Carrie Seale, a nurse during World War I.

    From Alabama Heritage, no. 123, Winter 2017: "Ida Carrie Seale, a Fort Deposit native who completed her training at a New Orleans hospital in 1903, was stationed at Base Hospital 24, one of the France's largest base hospitals. Located in Limoges, the base hospital was housed in an abandoned factory building flanked by military barracks, which served as patient wards. The hospital and its nearby sister hospitals Base Hospitals 13 and 28 were conveniently located near a railroad line. Men wounded on the front lines could be loaded onto train cars and quickly transported to the base hospital, where they were triaged on the platfrom and transferred to the appropriate ward for treatment. Between March 1918 and January 1919, Base Hospital 24 treated more than seven thousand men who were wounded at the front or contracted illnesses in the trenches." Included on the scrapbook pages are items she used, earned, or collected during the war, such as a nurse's cap; surgical scissors; awards and decorations; and pins, charms, patches, and tags.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Transcripts of materials related to nurse Julia Lide.

    The materials were compiled by the Office of the Surgeon General, United States War Department. Lide served as a nurse during the Spanish-American War and World War I. She was Alabama's only nurse to die overseas.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Identity card issued to Lieutenant Colonel Walter E. Bare.

    Bare became the acting commander of the 167th Rainbow Division on October 11, 1918 after Colonel William P. Screws fell ill. Bare served in that capacity until October 16, 1918, when the battle at Côte de Châtillon ended.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Will Clincy Gold Star file.

    The file includes a biographical form and a letter in addition to the photograph shown. During World War I, Clincy served as a private in Company F of the 366th U.S. Infantry Regiment. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for "extraordinary heroism" and "exceptional bravery" during an enemy raid near Frapelle, France, on September 4, 1918. Clincy was from Birmingham, Alabama and worked as a plumber with the Alabama Supply Company in Birmingham and as a pipe layer for W.D. Pulliam in Woodlawn, Alabama.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Letter from John Benjamin Fred Walters to his mother.

    Walters writes his mother, Louella Walters, about his experiences in the trenches on the front lines. The letter begins on page 5 of section 7 of the papers of John Benjamin Fred Walters.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Owen Fowler Gold Star file.

    The file includes a biographical form and two letters in addition to the photograph shown. Fowler is standing on the right in the photo. During World War I, he served as a bugler in Company E of the 366th U.S. Infantry Regiment. He died from battle wounds on November 13, 1918. He was from Hartselle, Alabama.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Transcript of a letter from John Durr to his mother, Lucy.

    In the letter John describes living conditions on the front lines in France; the shooting down of a German plane ("our first glimpse of war"); and the excitement most of the men feel during the fighting: "We stood on a hill under the moonlight last night, listening to a continuous roar of cannon, and watching the sky line flash with light and hearing the buzz of airoplanes [sic]. Beyond question, it was fascinating - to such an extent that thoughts of 'making the world safe for Democracy' had to be summoned as a legitimate excuse for enjoying the situation."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • "Genuine jazz for the Yankee wounded."

    "In the courtyard of a Paris hospital for the American wounded, an American negro military band, led by Lt. James R. Europe, entertains the patients with real American jazz." This photograph shows African American musicians in the 369th Infantry Regiment band led by James Reese Europe, a native of Mobile.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Hamilton Thompson Beggs Gold Star file.

    The file includes a biographical form and three letters in addition to the photograph shown. Beggs first enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1912 and served for four years on the U.S.S. Michigan, where he became an electrician. He then joined the U.S. Naval Reserve Corps in 1916 and was called to active duty when war broke out. At some point he was promoted to electrician second class, but his uniform in this photo is that of an electrician third class. He was aboard the U.S.S. Cyclops when it disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle in March 1918.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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