200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

Resources

  • Front page of the Roanoke Leader, proclaiming the end of World War I.

    In this "Official Peace Extra," the Roanoke Leader announces, "Germany Quits War for Sure" and "That Peace Has Come Is Officially Stated on Monday Morning." The page includes a portrait of President Woodrow Wilson. From vol. 27, no. 12, of the Roanoke Leader, Roanoke, Randolph County, Alabama.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • "Thousands Join in Big Celebration of Victory Over Hun Despotism."

    This clipping from the Tuscaloosa News describes the city's victory celebrations, including "the biggest parade that has ever been pulled off in the city [...] witnessed by what is said to have been the largest crowd ever assembled on the streets at one time." The author laments the parade's lack of music and describes the festivities as a "monster affair." From vol. 30, no. 122 of the Tuscaloosa News, Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Letter from Hugo Friedman in Venice, Italy, to his family.

    In the letter, Friedman tells his family that he will be moving to Padua and helping Italian prisoners of war now that the war has ended. Friedman was from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and worked for the American Red Cross in Italy during the war.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Advertisement for agricultural training at Tuskegee Institute.

    This advertisement encourages men and women to enroll in agricultural training courses at Tuskegee Institute because such training will be useful after the end of the war. It was printed in The Crisis, vol. 17, issue 1, from November 1918. The Crisis is the official magazine of the NAACP.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Materials concerning military deserters during demobilization.

    The first item, a telegram from Grosner B. Clarkson in Washington, D.C., to the Alabama Council of Defense, asks the state and local councils to continue assisting efforts to apprehend deserters. Clarkson states that desertion will "cripple execution of plans for well regulated demobilization" and negatively impact morale. In the second item, Lloyd M. Hooper, chairman of the Alabama Council of Defense, urges the counties to comply with Clarkson's message.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Letter from Penrose Vass Stout, en route to the United States, to Chas in France.

    TRANSCRIPT INCLUDED. During World War I, Stout was a pilot, eventually serving as a lieutenant in the 27th Aero Squadron, First Pursuit Group. In this brief note, he explains that he is departing France for the United States, and he includes a brief sketch of the Eiffel tower and the Statue of Liberty.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • Certificate granting George Moses an honorable discharge from the army at the end of World War I.

    A service record is included on the back of the document, describing his dates of service, battles and campaigns, skills, occupation, injuries, vaccinations, character, and conduct. Moses had served as a sergeant in Company A of the 4th Alabama Infantry (which became part of the 167th United States Infantry).

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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  • "Returning Soldiers."

    From vol. 18, no.1 of the official magazine of the NAACP. Written by editor W.E.B. DuBois, this article highlights the prejudice that African American soldiers face after returning from war, despite having done their duty for their country. He writes, "We return. We return from fighting. We return fighting. Make way for Democracy!" Includes the front cover, showing an African American soldier carving "The American Negro's Record in the Great World War" into a stone shield.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11, 12 (US Government)

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  • State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama, decorated for the return of soldiers after World War I.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Memorial for soldiers killed in action.

    "Floral tribute in memory of the six hundred and sixteen members of the 167th Regiment who made the supreme sacrifice in the World War. Carried in line of march by surviving comrades during the welcome home ceremonies in Montgomery, May 12, 1919."

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 7 (Civics), 9, 11

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  • Excerpts from a letter written by Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald.

    The first passage includes a letter from Zelda in May 1919, written from Montgomery, Alabama. In it she discusses homecoming celebrations in the city at the end of World War I, and she asks Scott about his next visit. She also mentions photographs she plans to take of herself; one of the images has been reprinted here. The letters appear in Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 4, 6, 9, 11

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