200 Alabama Bicentennial

Celebrating Alabama’s 200th birthday2017 2018 2019

Resources

  • Paleoindian Period Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. During the Paleoindian period, the first people arrived in Alabama. They hunted large animals, including mastodon and bison, using spear points made of stone.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Archaic Period Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. Archaic people experienced the end of the Ice Age and had to adapt to the disappearance of large animals due to climate change and over-hunting. This mural shows that they used grinding stones to crush nuts and seeds for their food and hunted smaller animals, including turkey and deer. They continued to use spears with stone points to hunt. They also made baskets of cane or bark, and used stone and clay pots for cooking.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Woodland Period Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. Woodland people began to live in larger and more complex communities due to advances in technology and farming. This mural shows that they used ceramic pottery made of clay mixed with sand or grit, and they wore woven cloth. People began cultivating crops such as corn, squash, and beans. They continued to use spears for hunting.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian Farming Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. Mississippians' primary crop was corn, but they also grew squash. In the mural, the girls in the front are using digging sticks to plant seeds. Mississippians also used hoes made out of bone to farm.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian carved stone bowl

    This stone bowl is carved in the shape of a bird-headed water monster and is attributed to the Late Mississippian Tradition. It was excavated in the Moundville, Hale County area by Clarence B. Moore in 1905.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian headdress

    This copper headdress is attributed to the Late Mississippian Tradition. It comes with a pin made of bone to secure it to the wearer's hair. It was excavated at Mound H near Moundville, Hale County by Clarence B. Moore in 1905 or 1906.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian pottery vessel

    This pottery vessel was formed in the shape of a woman with facial tattoos and is attributed to the Late Mississippian Tradition. It was excavated at Fort Toulouse in Elmore County by M. Paulin in 1932.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mural of Moundville

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. While this mural is not a primary source, it is representative of life at Moundville, showing the mounds as well as their housing and decorative symbols.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5

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  • Map of Moundville

    Map (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. While this map is not a primary source, it shows a diagram of the Mississippian town Moundville, one of the largest and most powerful Mississippian towns in North America.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 7 (Civics), 8

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  • Mississippian Technology Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. Mississippians made ornamental items, including beads, necklaces, and gorgets (pendants), out of shells. They also made fishhooks, hoes, and awls out of bones.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian Community Life Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. This mural shows men playing games in their community's central plaza. The central plaza, a feature common to all Mississippian towns and villages, was where people gathered for recreation and ceremonies. In the background are houses made of daubed mud and sticks.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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  • Mississippian Ceremony and Symbolism Mural

    Mural (painted by Karen Carr) on display in "The First Alabamians" museum exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). While the mural itself is not a primary source, the artist incorporated a number of primary source artifacts housed at ADAH into the scene depicted. Mississippian life was full of symbol and elaborate ceremony. This mural shows a ceremony taking place on top of a mound. On the right, the man is holding a monolithic ax, a status symbol commonly used in Mississippian ceremonies. At his feet are decorated pottery and two rattlesnake disks, the icon of Moundville culture.

    ALCOS Social Studies Content Standard Grade(s): 3, 5, 8

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